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Bluegrass & Backroads 1
Bluegrass & Backroads 2
Sustaining Our Seafood
Cleaning Water Growing Fish
Cleaning Water…Growing Fish is a 7:53 minute video to introduce how the United States has reclaimed water after municipal use and the concept of growing paddlefish fingerlings in the reclaimed water at decommissioned wastewater treatment plants. Suitable for all ages.
Sustaining our Seafood is a 13:45 minute video to provide information on the need for aquaculture in the United States and to use sustainable practices to be competitive in the global markets. Reuse of old wastewater facilities is a growing idea to use existing tanks, processed effluent and other infrastructure components to raise fish as stockers for aquaculture production. Fish are analyzed for heavy metals, pesticides and other contaminants to provide assurance to the public of its food safety. Suitable for all ages.
Bluegrass and Backroads (Kentucky Farm Bureau) Raymond’s Spoonbill Farm Part 1 (Episode 309) 8:03 minutes and Part 2 (Episode 511) 7:33 minutes provide information on the private use of a quarry lake for reservoir ranching of paddlefish for caviar. Part 1 shows owners of the lake, fish being stocked and five-year old fish being sampled with gill nets. Part 2 shows mature female fish being harvested, how caviar is made and the meat prepared for smoking. Suitable for teens and older.
Minimally Invasive Surgical Technique (MIST) is a procedure for quick removal of ovulated eggs from female paddlefish with nearly 100% survival. An internal incision of the oviduct is performed to allow eggs to freely flow out of the fish. Modified MIST accomplishes the same result of quick removal of ovulated eggs with high survival (about 100%) but uses an external incision and requires suturing.
MIST
Modified MIST
Reservoir Ranching the Perfect Fish
Aquaculture 2013 Paddlefish in Aquaculture:
Current and Future Directions